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Golfers Wanting Cleveland, Ohio, Golf Lessons Will Learn the Perfect Swing from an Instructor that Completed Rotary Swing Golf Certification

Doug Molls, who provides golf lessons in Cleveland, Ohio, has passed the first Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Golf Instructor Certification course and teaches the safest, most efficient swing humanly possible.

Cleveland, Ohio | March 5, 2011—Doug Molls became the eighth instructor to earn Level 1 RST Golf Certification on February 18, 2011.  Molls is the first person in Ohio to complete the initial phase of RotarySwing.com’s golf instructor training program, largely because of his strong belief in and enthusiasm for the instructional methods taught at RotarySwing.com.

“I believe RotarySwing.com has highlighted facts about the golf swing that other instructors choose to ignore or perhaps do not understand,” said Molls.  “From biomechanics, physics, anatomy and to how the brain ingrains new movements, Rotaryswing.com has it all.”

Molls joins five other instructors in the United States and two more internationally who have been certified in the twelve months since the program’s inception.  The speed at which Rotary Swing Golf Certification is spreading across the globe is not surprising to the company’s founder, Chuck Quinton.

“The bulk of our business originates from our strong web presence at RotarySwing.com, which doesn’t limit us to any geographic region,” said Quinton.  ”Combine that with an online golf certification process for our level one training that meets instructors’ needs for affordability and convenience, and I expect to see RST Certified Instructors everywhere golf is played.”

Quinton indicated that the golf instructor training program has received significant interest since it launched in February 2010 and is excited about the opportunities ahead for his business as well as for the RST Certified Instructors.

“The RST golf instructor certification promises to be a great vehicle for growth, not just for RotarySwing.com, but also for instructors teaching our methods,” said Quinton.  “The mutually beneficial nature of our certification program promises to drive its success.”

In addition to providing objective, scientific facts about golf instruction and the swing to improve golf coaching techniques, Rotary Swing Golf offers Certified Instructors promotional benefits to boost their revenues.  These golf instructors realize significant visibility through listings on the heavily trafficked RotarySwing.com, inclusion in weekly email newsletters to thousands of golfers, and postings on social media like Facebook and RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forums and Golf Instruction Blog.

“Not many golf instructors have websites that pull in thousands of visitors each day,” Quinton said.  “We can help them get their names out to potential students without spending a boatload on web design, search engine optimization, and online advertising.”

Ultimately, though, an instructor’s success comes down to the quality of golf instruction provided, and Quinton went to great lengths to ensure only the most knowledgeable golf instructors will earn certification.

According to the RST Golf Instructor Certification Overview page on RotarySwing.com, “The information that must be learned just to pass Level 1 requires on average 100 hours of study on swing mechanics, physics, anatomy, biomechanics, physiology and more.”  The website indicates that these fields represent “many disciplines typical golf instructor training neglects.”

For more information about RST Golf Instructor Certification, visit www.RotarySwing.com/rst-certification.

A link to the RST Certified Instructor listings, where Doug Molls’ bio and contact information for scheduling golf lessons in Cleveland, Ohio, can be found, is also available on that page.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 190 instructional videos, totaling over 20 hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, club fittings, and the new Online Learning Groups service.  Quinton has authored two books:  The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide, and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1.  He has also produced the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

# # #

This went out via Free-Press-Release.com on March 4, 2011.  You can find the FPR version here.

 
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Golfers Wanting Fairfield County, Connecticut, Golf Lessons Will Learn the Perfect Swing from an Instructor that Completed Rotary Swing Golf Certification

Jason Crouse, who provides golf lessons in Fairfield County, Connecticut, has passed the first Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Golf Instructor Certification course and teaches the safest, most efficient swing humanly possible.

Norwalk, Connecticut | February 1, 2011 — Jason Crouse became the seventh instructor to earn Level 1 RST Golf Certification on January 13, 2011.  Crouse is the first person in Connecticut to complete the initial phase of RotarySwing.com’s golf instructor training program, largely because of his strong belief in and enthusiasm for the RST golf swing system.

“When I first found the RST program, I fell in love with it,” said Crouse, “and my appreciation for the method has only increased. If we follow it correctly, we can play our best golf with minimum impact on the body.”

Crouse joins four other instructors in the United States and two more internationally who have been certified in the eleven months since the program’s inception.  The speed at which Rotary Swing Golf Certification is spreading across the globe is not surprising to the company’s founder, Chuck Quinton.

“The bulk of our business originates from our strong web presence at RotarySwing.com, which doesn’t limit us to any geographic region,” said Quinton.  ”Combine that with an online golf certification process for our level one training that meets instructors’ needs for affordability and convenience, and I expect to see RST Certified Instructors everywhere golf is played.”

Quinton indicated that the golf instructor training program has received significant interest since it launched in February 2010 and is excited about the opportunities ahead for his business as well as for the RST Certified Instructors.

“The RST golf instructor certification promises to be a great vehicle for growth, not just for RotarySwing.com, but also for instructors teaching our methods,” said Quinton.  “The mutually beneficial nature of our certification program promises to drive its success.”

In addition to providing objective, scientific facts about golf instruction and the swing to improve golf coaching techniques, Rotary Swing Golf offers Certified Instructors promotional benefits to boost their revenues.  These golf instructors realize significant visibility through listings on the heavily trafficked RotarySwing.com, inclusion in weekly email newsletters to thousands of golfers, and postings on social media like Facebook and RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forums and Golf Instruction Blog.

“Not many golf instructors have websites that pull in thousands of visitors each day,” Quinton said.  “We can help them get their names out to potential students without spending a boatload on web design, search engine optimization, and online advertising.”

Ultimately, though, an instructor’s success comes down to the quality of golf instruction provided, and Quinton went to great lengths to ensure only the most knowledgeable golf instructors will earn certification.

According to the RST Golf Instructor Certification Overview page on RotarySwing.com, “The information that must be learned just to pass Level 1 requires on average 100 hours of study on swing mechanics, physics, anatomy, biomechanics, physiology and more.”  The website indicates that these fields represent “many disciplines typical golf instructor training neglects.”

For more information about RST Golf Instructor Certification, visit www.RotarySwing.com/rst-certification.

A link to the RST Certified Instructor listings, where Jason Crouse’s bio and contact information for scheduling golf lessons in Fairfield County, Connecticut, can be found, is also available on that page.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 190 instructional videos, totaling over 20 hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with more than 5200 members, club fittings, and the new Online Learning Groups service.  Quinton has authored two books:  The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide, and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1.  He has also produced the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

# # #

This went out via Free-Press-Release.com on January 31, 2011.  You can find the FPR version here.

 
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Develop a Powerful Weight Shift for Better Golf Shots

Great article and videos showing you what the proper weight shift is and how to feel it in your golf swing: http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/golfbiomechanics/weight-shift-golf-swing.php

 
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Coming Under the Swing Plane

A very common problem, especially for the better player. This leads to a lot of blocks and hooks. Learn how to fix it and what causes it in this latest article – Building an On Plane Golf Swing

 
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Perfect Impact Position Every Time

One of the defining hallmarks of the RST golf swing is getting into a perfect impact position, both biomechanically and from a physics point of view, every time. Here’s a pic of professional golfer Craig Morrow after his work this week with RST Founder, Chuck Quinton, at impact. Just for fun, we threw in a picture of Chuck at impact about 12 years ago in the middle and where he is today on the right. All we can say is “Ouch!” Good thing he invented RST or he wouldn’t be playing golf much longer swinging like that!

RST Impact Position

 
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Golfers Wanting Washington/Baltimore Area Golf Lessons Will Learn Proper Biomechanics from an Instructor that Completed Rotary Swing Golf Certification

Ray Wyvill, who provides golf lessons in the metropolitan Washington/Baltimore area, added Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Golf Instructor Certification to his instruction résumé and teaches the safest, most efficient swing humanly possible.

November 23, 2010 | Shady Side, Maryland — Ray Wyvill became the sixth instructor to earn Level 1 RST Golf Certification on November 15, 2010.  Wyvill is the first person in Maryland to complete the initial phase of RotarySwing.com’s golf instructor training program.

Wyvill has significant experience instructing in fields outside of golf, where he’s a certified technical instructor.  For the past 5 years, Wyvill has been a student of Rotary Swing instruction and is well prepared to share his knowledge with others.

“Being an Instructor here is the culmination of much work and is in every sense a privilege,” said Wyvill.  “Being an Instructor gives me the opportunity to help golfers achieve their goals by facilitating the scientifically-based Rotary Swing Tour learning method.”

Wyvill joins three other instructors in the United States and two more internationally who have been certified in the nine months since the program’s inception.  The speed at which Rotary Swing Golf Certification is spreading across the globe is not surprising to the company’s founder, Chuck Quinton.

“The bulk of our business originates from our strong web presence at RotarySwing.com, which doesn’t limit us to any geographic region,” said Quinton.  ”Combine that with an online golf certification process for our level one certification that meets instructors’ needs for affordability and convenience, and I expect to see RST Certified Instructors everywhere golf is played.”

Quinton indicated that the golf instructor training program has received significant interest since it launched in February 2010 and is excited about the opportunities ahead for his business as well as for the RST Certified Instructors.

“The RST golf instructor certification promises to be a great vehicle for growth, not just for RotarySwing.com, but also for instructors teaching our methods,” said Quinton.  “The mutually beneficial nature of our certification program promises to drive its success.”

In addition to providing objective, scientific facts about golf instruction and the swing to improve golf coaching techniques, Rotary Swing Golf offers Certified Instructors promotional benefits to boost their revenues.  These golf instructors realize significant visibility through listings on the heavily trafficked RotarySwing.com, inclusion in weekly email newsletters to thousands of golfers, and postings on social media like Facebook and RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forums and Golf Instruction Blog.

“Not many golf instructors have websites that pull in thousands of visitors each day,” Quinton said.  “We can help them get their names out to potential students without spending a boatload on web design, search engine optimization, and online advertising.”

Ultimately, though, an instructor’s success comes down to the quality of golf instruction provided, and Quinton went to great lengths to ensure only the most knowledgeable golf instructors will earn certification.

According to the RST Golf Instructor Certification Overview page on RotarySwing.com, “The information that must be learned just to pass Level 1 requires on average 100 hours of study on swing mechanics, physics, anatomy, biomechanics, physiology and more.”  The website indicates that these fields represent “many disciplines typical golf instructor training neglects.”

For more information about RST Golf Instructor Certification, visit www.RotarySwing.com/rst-certification.

Ray Wyvill’s bio and contact information for scheduling golf lessons in the metropolitan Washington/Baltimore area can be found here.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com, and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling over 20 hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with more than 5200 members, club fittings, and the new Online Learning Groups service.  Quinton has authored two books:  The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide, and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1.  He has also produced the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

# # #

This went out via Free-Press-Release.com on November 23, 2010.  You can find the FPR version here.

 
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How To Properly Learn the Golf Swing

You’ve probably heard the old saying that if people tried to learn how to make love the same way they go about learning the golf swing that the human race become extinct. Sadly, golfers have millions of dollars in lessons and rarely ever improve. No matter how good the intentions of the instructor are, if they don’t understand how to teach their students new movement patterns based on how the brain actually learns, the student has little chance of ever improving.

Rotary Swing Tour is built entirely around this concept and has developed the only learning system in the world that is based entirely on the latest neural research in how the brain learns new motor movement patterns. That’s why ALL our students make dramatic, visible swing changes that are permanent like the one you see below:

In only one day, my student pictured above was able to completely transform his entire backswing working through the simple drills I have shared in the video “5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing“. If you’d like to learn more about how you can make these changes, visit “How to Build the Perfect Backswing“.

 
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Former David Leadbetter Student Switches to Rotary Swing Tour

Golfers who are very serious about their games and understand the swing well typically stick with an instructor they believe shares similar ideas for a long time. Ik-Joon Lee falls under that category. After working with David Leadbetter for 6 years at the IMG Academy which costs over $50k per year for the privilege, Ik-Joon felt he was not getting the answers to his swing he was looking for. He always struggled with a weak, high ball flight and getting stuck on the downswing. After 6 years of being told his swing “looked great and it’s just in your head – you need to play more often”, he finally took a break from the game and believed what Leadbetter and his instructors were telling him.

It’s pretty frustrating to spend over $350,000 to be told essentially, “there’s nothing else we can do for your swing, it must just be you.” So when Ik-Joon got in touch with me for lessons he was pretty excited to find out that I DIDN’T believe that it was in his head but it WAS in fact in his poor mechanics. In fact, I saw quite a LOT wrong with his swing and felt that we needed to do some serious work on it. Over the next week, the transformation was quite incredible. Below is a pic of how we changed his impact position to produce a penetrating ball flight by using the drills and videos on this website. To find out more and read the rest of the story, visit http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/golfbiomechanics/former-david-leadbetter-student-turns-to-rotary-swing.php

Former David Leadbetter Student switches to Rotary Swing Tour

Former David Leadbetter Student switches to Rotary Swing Tour

 
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Why Golf Swing Movement Instruction’s Not ALWAYS Better Than Ball Flight Instruction…

By Sam Jarman, RST Certified Instructor – Level 1

I’m writing this after reading Chuck’s excellent article about Ball flight teachers on the blog. This is perhaps the most common sense I’ve read in one place about the different approaches to teaching the golf swing.

Chuck was in turn responding to an email I received from another golf professional about a piece I recently wrote on the blog about fixing my backswing by working in the studio on the movement, rather than hitting golf balls.

Chuck’s response was very clear and black and white, as it was addressing a specific issue, that of long term improvement. Unless you have a clear understanding of the biomechanics of the golf swing and work towards implementing them correctly, you will always be chasing your tail and putting Band Aids on top of Band Aids.

As we all know, you can make any golf swing work if you are very talented and hit enough golf balls. Most of us do not have unlimited practice time and bundles of talent. I believe there is a “best”, most efficient way to swing a golf club, and at present, the Rotary Swing Tour (RST) is it. Working towards this model is the route to long term success.

However, in the “real world”, things are rarely black and white. Varying shades of grey are much more common. I’m sure Chuck will agree with me when I suggest that we as teachers come across situations every day where the teacher and student together need to make a decision as to whether a ball flight lesson is required, or a golf swing movement lesson.

As a good teacher, I feel I should be able to do both, and I know Chuck does too. The student is the customer, and unless I have the kind of relationship with the student where we can talk about what is happening in his or her game, talk about what their immediate and long term plans are and come to an agreement about exactly what direction we should take and when, I probably shouldn’t be teaching them.

I had a typical situation with a student this week. Steve is a very good player, a 1 handicap. He has a good, well grooved golf swing, but has a very shut clubface at the top of the swing and, as a result, is prone to hooks and blocks and has trouble controlling his distances with short irons.

We started working together on RST in April, but made a decision to leave the major changes till after the season had finished. We sorted out Steve’s strong grip, bad ball position, and poor balance and posture.
He has since played some good golf, culminating in him reaching the final of his club Scratch Matchplay championship.

He came for a tune up lesson this week as he was hitting his wedges poorly, with a lack of distance control and the odd bad pull. These are all symptoms of the shut clubface at the top of the swing. But the last thing I wanted to do the week before an important match was to give a golf swing movement lesson and have Steve going out and playing “Golf Swing”, rather than playing golf.

It was clear in this situation that a ball flight lesson was required. I explained to Steve what I thought, how his swing differed from the RST model, and what I wanted to do.

He agreed, so we got him to set up slightly open with his wedges, to open the face slightly at address and move the ball forward, and to exaggerate the feeling he has anyway of holding the clubface off through the ball. The result was what felt like a little fade with his wedges, the opposite of his natural drawing ball flight. Due to the loft on the clubface the ball doesn’t actually move left to right in the air, it just floats and sits, which makes distance control easier and also gives some protection against the pull, the real problem shot with a short iron.

After 45 minutes practising this ball flight, Steve started to feel like he had much better control of his distances. He will practice some more this week, and I’m confident he will play well in his final.

Next Sunday we will head into the studio and start work on the big issues in his swing, safe in the knowledge we have all winter to get them fixed and to get Steve feeling comfortable and confident before the season starts again in April.

One point which is often brought up as a justification for just teaching someone to change their ball flight is that by changing the ball flight, the golf swing movement itself will change. This has some validity. If you teach a slicer to draw the ball, eventually the movement will change to allow the club to come more from the inside.

However, I’m not sure how efficient this method of learning is, or how lasting the changes will be. I have the feeling that you would need to hit a huge number of golf shots to effect significant change. I know from my own experience over the years that it wasn’t until I learned to move properly and understood the cause and effect relationship of movement of the body and movement of the club, that I really began to get control of my ball flight.

I am absolutely committed to RST as a swing model and a “Method”, for all the reasons that Chuck explains in great detail in the blog and on the website. My long term goal for myself and for every single one of my students is to help them swing as efficiently, correctly and safely as possible. RST helps me to understand what is going wrong in a golfer’s swing, to understand the compensations which exist to allow the golfer to hit the ball well sometimes and to plan and implement a programme of improvement.

But at the same time, I still consider myself a tournament golfer, and I know how it is virtually impossible to play your best golf while thinking consciously about your swing. Chuck’s Mushin Golf articles describe a great mindset to play well. I just like to focus totally on the target and let the ball go to it.

There is a time and a place to work on the golf swing movement, and a time and place to focus on just flighting the ball to the target. It is up to the teacher and the student to communicate and come to a decision about the best way to proceed to ensure the student both enjoys his golf and improves his skills and technique in the long run.

As an RST instructor, I know I have the depth of knowledge and understanding to deliver the right lesson at the right time for all the people I work with. As a movement coach, I can give either type of lesson. A ball flight coach is more limited in his options.

Note: This article was originally written in October.

To contact Sam for lessons or learn more about him, check out his Certified Instructor bio and his golf instruction website.

 
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Ball Flight Teachers

In the world of golf instruction, there are basically two different types of teachers – ball flight teachers and method teachers. As someone who has spent years researching and developing the golf swing, it should come as no surprise that I fall in to the latter as a method teacher. RST is a method based on science, primarily the science of anatomy and human movement. It has parameters and “laws” if you will that are in place to guide you along the path and keep you from injuring yourself and developing bad habits.

A ball flight teacher only has the laws of ball flight to guide you along the way. For instance, if you slice, the ball flight teacher may have 5 or more different ways to fix your problem. All of these “fixes” can typically be called “band-aid” fixes because they only address symptoms of poor mechanics rather than the cause. As an example, imagine the golfer who doesn’t make a full shoulder turn and so he lifts his arms very steep to the top of the backswing and then hacks down from the top with only his arms; thus producing an over the top swing plane and out to in path. The ball flight teacher may fix this by having the golfer strengthen his grip to square the clubface to the path to create a pull. No doubt, this is better than a slice, but we haven’t addressed the root cause of the problem.

An RST golf instructor would look at this problem completely differently. The first thing we would do is teach the golfer what is causing his path and plane issues, which, in this case is the lack of body rotation which adds depth to the swing. Next, we would teach the golfer exactly HOW to turn, using the correct muscles. From there, the golfer would immediately see himself in positions he has never achieved and is now on the pathway to LASTING change and improvement.

We don’t do band-aids, we teach you how to move correctly. We fix the problem, not the symptom. Proper movements create a proper plane, path, impact position, etc. Chasing after ball flight problems without fixing faulty movement patterns is no different than a doctor that treats a compound fracture by putting a band-aid over it rather than resetting the bone. If you want lasting improvement and change in your game, stop putting band-aids on it and avoid ball flight instructors because you’ll end up having to go back again and again to apply new band-aids as the old ones “fall off”.

Of course, it should be made clear that I’m not saying ball flight is unimportant. It is very important. I’m simply saying the reason golfers haven’t improved over the past 50 years is because instruction hasn’t ever addressed the root cause of the problem. The truth of the matter is that ball flight is EASY to fix once the basic proper movement patterns have been established, which is exactly what RotarySwing.com is all about. We teach people via our online learning system HOW to create this basic, very simple movement patterns that you can see below in my swing:

Chuck Quinton Golf Swing

In the video of my swing above, you can see that my movements are very simple, very efficient, and if you compared my swing to that of Tiger Woods, you’d see striking similarity (for the comparison, click Build the Golf Swing of Your Dreams). The reason is that Tiger and I both move very efficiently and that movement is based on very basic anatomy and physics. When I hit a bad shot, say a cut shot, I don’t go and try and flip the face or strengthen my grip on the next swing, that would be manic constantly chasing after one fix or another! No, I simply look at the basic movement that created that shot. For me, if I hit a cut shot, I know I pulled too much with the left shoulder coming down and I have several drills, all of which are on the website, to correct the faulty movement. Therefore, I drill the correct movement for the next shot and correct the problem, thus fixing the symptom of the bad ball flight.

It’s the only way that makes ANY sense to learn the golf swing whatsoever. If you’re tired of bouncing from golf tip to golf tip that are all symptom based, get with the program – the Rotary Swing Tour Program and start progressing like all those in these testimonials.

 
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Golfers Receive Unlimited Online Golf Lessons from RotarySwing.com’s Certified Instructors for Less than the Cost of One In-person Lesson

RotarySwing.com’s Latest Innovation, Online Learning Groups, Bridges the Gap Between Its Twenty-plus Hours of Online Golf Instruction Videos and In-person Lessons by Offering One Low Monthly Payment for Unlimited Online Golf Lessons with a Certified Instructor.

Windermere, FL | September 16, 2010 — Last week, RotarySwing.com launched a new feature called Online Learning Groups. At its core, this feature allows a golfer to easily submit videos, pictures, and questions to Rotary Swing Tour Certified Instructors and receive feedback about how to improve. While others in the industry offer similar online golf lessons, what sets the Groups concept apart are three additional benefits: unlimited instruction for less than the cost of one traditional lesson, a library of more than 20 hours of online golf instruction videos to support the process, and an ability to learn from peer group members.

The concept was originally proposed by one of the website’s members, Ray Wyvill, as a way to provide ongoing review of swing changes, monitoring that bad habits don’t creep back in and ensuring continual progression. Wyvill’s inspiration came from something his father told him about the one-room schools prevalent decades ago.

This is how Wyvill remembered his father’s words: “He said, ‘The best school I was ever in was the one-room school when I was a kid. More learning went on there than in any other school environment I ever saw. You’d be there working on something, the older kids would be working on what you’d get next, and the young kids were providing you with constant review.’”

RotarySwing.com’s Online Learning Groups are setup to foster this sort of 360-degree learning as students learn directly from instructors, by observing the instruction provided to other students, and by jumping in and helping their peers with an issue they’ve already tackled.

The economics of the group concept helps golfers get better at an affordable price. While in-person lessons typically range from $40 to $200 each and one standard online lesson can go for $30 or more, Online Learning Groups provide value by pairing unlimited online golf lessons with a price tag of $29.95 per month.

“In-person lessons offer some obvious advantages,” RotarySwing.com founder Chuck Quinton said. “But there are also some major drawbacks, including the price, which is on everyone’s mind these days because of the economy. With an Online Learning Group, for example, you’ll get expert help with a swing issue, and then you can have that re-checked a week later and even ask for some new advice a week after that…all for only $29.95. Compare that to in-person lessons, where you’ve just racked up three full lesson charges, probably totaling $200 or more.”

The feature’s success, though, will ultimately be determined by the experience of the group members. The results are extremely positive so far, based on feedback from those who took part in the pilot group the past three months.

“This is an experience like no other; you can post your swing and have members and an instructor critique it,” said pilot group member Steve Dodson. “This ensures your work on each move is done correctly, and if you’re applying this move correctly in your full swing. If you’re not a member, you’re missing out.”

More information about RotarySwing.com’s Online Learning Groups can be found here:http://www.rotaryswing.com/online-golf-lessons/learning-groups-home.php.

Free and Premium Membership details are available at http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/membership_info.php.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via RotarySwing.com, OnePlaneGolfSwing.com, and RotaryGolfSwing.com. These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling 20-plus hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, and club fittings. Quinton has authored two books: The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1. He has also produced the golf instruction DVDs Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple. More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

# # #

This release went out via PRWeb.com on 8/6/2010.  You can find the PRWeb version here.

 
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Learn How I’m Fixing My Top of Backswing Position with Proper Practice…

By Sam Jarman, RST Certified Instructor – Level 1

I’ve been working hard on my own game over the past few weeks, especially my posture and top of backswing position.  I played poorly in the National Assistants at East Sussex National a few weeks ago and that gave me a real kick up the backside as I felt I was playing well going into the tournament.  It proves that although on my good days I can play some really good stuff, my ball striking is still too inconsistent, especially in tough conditions as was the case at East Sussex in the first round.  Despite some decent driving, I just wasn’t controlling my golf ball well enough with my irons.

I put myself on video when I got back and there were some things I really didn’t like.  My posture was sloppy, I wasn’t loading into my right glute and right heel in the backswing, my right arm was loose and away from my body at the top of backswing position, my transition was weak and I was sliding rather than turning in the downswing.   All of which was leading to big pulls with my irons, and weak cuts with my driver.

There are two videos here which show the issues.

My first point of call was my posture.  I made sure I was sat back into my glutes and that my weight was going down through my ankles. I then set to work on my backswing movements and top of backswing position.  I have always had a problem sliding my hips to the right and getting onto the ball and the outside of my right foot.  It’s much better than it used to be before I started working on the Rotary swing stuff, but it still creeps back in.

The main point I want to stress in this piece is that I didn’t hit that many golf balls when I was working on this. One of the main conclusions I have come to is that a golf ball is a very poor feedback device when it comes to gaining information as to whether you have made a good movement or not.  You can hit a pretty decent golf shot with a not very good golf swing, and you can shank it with a move that is very close to perfect.

You can draw a couple of conclusions from this.  This first might be that if that is the case, why work on the swing at all?  Work on your short game and putting and accept the bad shots and learn to recover from them.  It seems to work pretty well for Phil Mickelson.  I actually think this is a great plan for most amateur golfers, except for the fact that very few people want to learn about and work hard on their short game.  Everyone I talk to wants to hit long, straight golf shots and to look good doing it.

This brings us to the second option; which is to work on the movement of the golf swing in a time and energy efficient way.  To cram as much learning into as short a time as possible, and to make that learning as durable as possible.  I promise you hitting golf balls is not the best way to learn the golf swing. Hitting balls is useful to see what the results of the change in movement pattern might be, but it is nigh on impossible to actually make the changes while worrying about where the ball has gone.

Most of my time was spent without a club and a ball, in front of two mirrors, one in front and one down the line, making small movements, chunking the movements down, chaining them back up until I could feel and, crucially, see in the mirrors exactly which parts of my body were doing what. Once I could feel it, I picked up a club and went over the process again, watching the effect that small changes in body position would have on the relative positions of the shaft and the clubface.

A real breakthrough was the understanding of the way the weight shift in the backswing affects the right arm.

As I wrote on the Forum; “I have always had trouble getting  the right arm under the club at the top of the backswing; I tend to get it loose and behind me.  I get over the top in the downswing and hit cuts with the driver and pulls with the irons.  Not pretty.

“Anyway, long story short, I had gotten a bit sloppy with my posture, and also was getting slightly onto the ball of my right foot, and not loaded into my right glute in the backswing.  Worked all day Friday on Move 1 weight shift and getting really planted onto the heel and into the glute.  Put myself on video on Sunday and the difference was very noticeable.  For the first time (ever?) I’m keeping the right arm in front of me and getting it under the club.

“Just thought I’d share this as I know a lot of people are struggling with the top of the backswing position, and maybe focusing on the right arm and shoulder elevation.  I thought it might be a lack of flexibility that was causing the problem.  As soon as I got the right heel in the ground and into the glute, the right arm just started behaving itself with no effort at all.  So if you are struggling with Move 2, go back and make sure you have Move 1 nailed down first.  For me, Move 2 is more of a result of a good Move 1 than a move on its own.”

The key point for me is that if I hadn’t been using the mirrors, I wouldn’t have spotted this. It was so obvious. At the top of the backswing it works this way:  Weight on the heel and in the glute, right arm in a good position.  Weight on the ball of the foot, right arm wings out and gets behind me.  Instant feedback.

For years I have been working on keeping the right arm tucked in.  I could have written a novel in the time I have spent hitting balls with a bloody glove in my right armpit.  What happens when the glove comes out?  The right arm flies away, because the problem isn’t the right arm, it’s the way the torso is moving over the hips.

Here is a video with my backswing starting to look somewhere near where I want it.  Next step is Move 3, the transition.

To learn more about Sam or contact him for lessons, check out his Certified Instructor bio and his golf instruction website.

 
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The Most Worthless Criterion for Making U.S. Ryder Cup Selections

By Josh Eaton, Rotary Swing Golf Business ManagerWhat's Eating at Eaton in Golf? Blog

Here I sit.  Irritated by so-called golf experts.  What a surprise.

You would have thought golf writers, TV commentators, and more fans would have paid attention during the last edition of the Ryder Cup.  I mean, American victories are so rare (especially blowouts), people are bound to notice them, right?

Wrong.

With U.S. Captain Corey Pavin set to announce his four at-large Ryder Cup selections tomorrow, a slew of writers, commentators, and fans continue extolling the virtues of having prior Ryder Cup experience.

Why?

The American team won in 2008 with six rookies.  Half the team had never been in what Jason Sobel of ESPN.com calls the “Ryder Cup pressure cooker.”

He must be shocked those newbies survived, much less won.

Before the event, I was personally thrilled that the 2008 team had so much new blood and rid itself of quite a bit of dead weight from the prior few matches, including stalwarts like Davis Love III (44% point percentage), Couples (45%), Tiger Woods (44%), David Toms (42%), Chris DiMarco (29%), Paul Azinger (43%), Mark Calcavecchia (46%), and David Duval (33%).  Plenty of others disagreed with my opinion, calling for Azinger to pick fading stars like Love III and Couples to offset the dangerous inexperience of many on the team.

But why would any captain look to pick a guy with “experience” when the present Americans’ experiences have been putrid the past couple of decades?

I’d rather have someone unproven in the Ryder Cup than someone who has, time and again, proven they can lose.

I like having some hope.  Is that so wrong?

What is experience supposed to provide anyway?  They don’t play the same course each time.  These guys have all played thousands of rounds before.  I can’t imagine any of them not having a fair amount of match play experience somewhere along the way.

The only argument I consistently hear is that the experience will help with the pressure.

That must be it.  Because these guys—24 of the best players on the planet—have never really faced much pressure on the course, right?

Peter Kostis said before the ’08 Ryder Cup that rookies lack “major-league experience.”

What?

We’re not talking about college players, Nationwide players, or even lower level PGA guys here.  We’re talking about guys who are consistently on the leaderboard on Sundays, both in regular Tour stops and major tourneys.  How else do you climb high enough in the rankings to be named to a Cup team?

Plus, isn’t there a consensus that the U.S. players care more about majors and individual accomplishments anyway?  If that’s true, it seems to be a contradiction to think that they will feel more pressure at the Ryder Cup than when in contention for an individual trophy.

Finally, consider this: Tiger Woods has been in as many pressure situations as anyone playing the game today, and he had tremendous success in match play before joining the Tour (and pretty good success in individual match play events since).

Yet, he has a less than stellar record in the Ryder Cup.  If that much experience doesn’t help (arguably) the best player ever to enjoy more Cup success, why do we spend any time at all lauding experience unless it is good experience?

We shouldn’t.

Now, if we can just get Pavin to think that way and avoid a guy like Stewart Cink* (40% point percentage), who one writer thinks would bring “seasoning” to the young squad.  (Would that seasoning go well with whatever’s in Sobel’s pressure cooker?)

That same writer (Ron Green Jr. of the Charlotte Observer) and a few other “experts” recommend Couples as well.  I like Couples as much as the next guy, but guys, seriously, it’s time to move on.

According to Green Jr., “what Freddie brings goes beyond his golf, which has been outstanding this year. He brings camaraderie. He brings that Freddie vibe.”  Ugh, enough with the man-crush!  What he brings are a poor personal record and a history of team losses.  How could picking Couples possibly be better than giving a hungry young guy a chance?

Let’s just hope that Pavin follows in the footsteps of his predecessor, Paul Azinger, who said this before the last Ryder Cup:

I’ve said this all along, that to me, experience is important but it is also overrated. I mean, experience now, anyone who has played Ryder Cup in the last six Ryder Cups has experience getting their (butt) beat. So, I mean, I’m not looking for experience.

Amen.

* I’d also recommend not taking Tiger except that Rory McIlroy called him out a couple of weeks ago.  If you’ve forgotten what happened when Stephen Ames provoked Tiger before the World Match Play Championship in 2006, check this out: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/22/AR2006022202739.html.

Note that individual player records were obtained here:  http://www.rydercup.com/2010/usa/history/us_player_records.cfm

 
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RotarySwing.com’s Free Golf Instruction Videos Eliminate Golf Swing Confusion, Helping Golfers—and the Company—Improve

Thanks to the Two-plus Hours of Free Golf Instruction Videos Online, RotarySwing.com’s Free Members Overcome Prior Golf Swing Confusion, Leading to Better Scores and Driving Many to Become Premium Members.

Windermere, Florida | September 4, 2010 — In March of 2010, RotarySwing.com introduced a free golf instruction membership that includes the basics of both the original Rotary Swing and the new Rotary Swing Tour (RST). Company founder Chuck Quinton contends that instructor preferences, fads, and gimmicks have left golfers confused about what to believe when it comes to golf instruction, and offering a library of free golf instruction videos built around the scientific “truths about golf instruction” has allowed Quinton to reach more players who have struggled to improve due to the contradictory and ambiguous nature of today’s traditional golf instruction.

John Neugent, owner of Neuvation Cycling and one of RotarySwing.com’s free members who later converted to Premium Membership, described his experience this way: “I can know what I am supposed to do rather than guess what I am supposed to be doing. I have lots of books but all of them really don’t tell you what to do. They tell you the result.”

Quinton refers to this as teaching “how” to move during the swing rather than teaching “what” club positions to hit.

“Too many instructors tell students to focus on golf club positions, even though the player has no idea how to move his body to get the club there,” Quinton explained. “The club doesn’t swing itself; it ends up in the right position only if you move correctly.”

Others have also expressed their relief at finding a free golf instruction video system that they can believe in.

“After watching the free videos, I quickly realized the golf action Chuck is teaching is based on common sense fundamentals that most tour professionals use today,” Michael Beaty, another member who upgraded to the paid membership, said. “I also realized Chuck had a talent for explaining the golf swing in a way that makes sense.”

In addition to offering fact-based, scientific golf instruction, the free golf videos contain extensive information that helps students understand the entire methodology.

“You provide a lot of freebies which are very substantive and not just the ‘tip of the week,’” Daniel Boers offered in a New Member Survey after choosing to go the premium route.

Parker Gallagher made the same membership decision and shared this: “Excellent, thorough, detailed and comprehensive free information had me wanting more and the price/value (of a Premium Membership) was excellent.”

While the Free Membership has been a hit with golfers searching for free golf instruction videos online, there were initial concerns that releasing so much information would reduce the desire for some potential customers to sign up for the paid membership.

“It wasn’t without risk,” RotarySwing.com founder Chuck Quinton said. “Some online instructors give you free videos that just contain hints at what they teach. Not us. The basics for my golf swing systems are now totally free. I took a chance that once people buy into my fact-based approach, they’ll see the value in continuing into the Premium Membership, which takes things to a whole other level with the largest library of consistent golf instruction videos on the web-—over 20 hours in total.”

Five months of results indicate the strategy has worked, according to Quinton, as Premium Membership has grown considerably since the free golf videos were added, despite the continued economic downturn.

From a student’s perspective, Dave Ramos, CEO of the Dashboard Group, made the switch from free to premium and seconds the notion that it worked. “I have been to golf camps, taken lessons with PGA professionals, watched videos, read magazines, and even bought stuff I saw on infomercials. Nothing worked. They all told me a different thing, often contradicting each other. In contrast, Rotary Swing is a comprehensive and integrated approach that is scientifically and biometrically proven. The lessons tell you exactly what to do, why you need to do it that way, and exactly how. This is not a quick-fix scam, but a sound, long-term strategy for great golf. Full speed ahead!”

Free and Premium Membership details are available at http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/membership_info.php.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via RotarySwing.com, OnePlaneGolfSwing.com, and RotaryGolfSwing.com. These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling more than 20 hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, and club fittings. Quinton has authored two books: The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1. He has also produced the golf instruction DVDs Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple. More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

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This release went out via PRWeb.com on 8/25/2010.  You can find the PRWeb version here.

 
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Where in the world is CQ?

Hey guys, summer is sadly on the other side of the hill now for most of you as we near mid-August and I’ve been getting a lot of emails about what the heck I’m doing this summer and where’s the Christina Project? Don’t worry, it will be up and running soon, but you can blame the delay on me. I decided to spend my summer doing things I missed, hiking, climbing, biking, snowboarding, etc. in the mountains of Colorado. It’s been a major refresher for me and allowed me to charge my batteries for a very busy upcoming winter as we plan to do more clinics than we ever have as demand has exceeded the number of clinics I’ve done in the past.

With regards to demand, I want to personally thank you, the members, for referring so many of your friends to the Rotary Swing. In the past year, the website membership has more than doubled and demand for the Rotary Swing Tour swing model both online and in person lessons and clinics has been incredible, so thanks!

This winter will be a big one for those following RST as we continue to unveil more of the research we’ve done with TaylorMade Performance Labs and do new research to show you exactly how to build the safest and most efficient golf swing possible. But not before I sneak in one more mountain bike race! For those who have asked, that’s primarily what I have been doing this summer. I got my first downhill mountain bike 7 weeks ago and won my first downhill race today at Keystone. Obviously, to get a win after riding for only 7 weeks means that I’ve been riding – A LOT! And that’s where most of my time has gone. I decided that I wanted to do this, fell in love with it and am riding 3-4 days per week in the mountains. Here’s a pic of me on the podium from my race today (PS if you want to see video of me riding, go here: mountain bike videos):

Chuck Quinton 1st Place

Chuck Quinton 1st Place

Taking a break from golf has been very healthy for me and I look forward to coming back to Florida in October and starting up full swing again!

PS Tiger, you might consider a break too!

 
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