How to Chip Better in Golf: Perfect Your Technique with the Rotary Connect

Have you ever been told you are too handsy when chipping?

Maybe you are flipping the club through impact? Have you been hitting your chips fat and thin?

You have most likely been given bad advice by a teaching professional, or playing partner that is leading to higher scores around the green.

In the last couple of videos we learned how having the proper setup and technique can help you shave strokes off your game from around the green.

Now you can learn how using a device that you most likely already have can make these moves seem simpler than ever.

The Rotary Connect!

I see people everyday give up strokes by using the improper chipping motion. The Rotary Connect will help you to use your arms and body as a unit and get rid of your flip forever.

The chipping backswing and full shot backswing are very similar. An easy mistake to make is to bend the right arm too early and over hinge the right wrist. This brings the club back too far to the inside and can lead to a lot of inconsistency.

With the Rotary Connect you can cure this by keeping some pressure on the inside of the cuff during the backswing.  This forces you to get a better shoulder turn and less arm action, resulting in a much more consistent stroke.

What about flipping? Well when you flip or “chicken wing” after impact your left arm is folding. With the Rotary connect securely fastened to your arms this will feel very unnatural. By keeping some pressure on the cuff with your left arm in the follow through you will eliminate your flip forever.

In fact it was just the other day I was working with a student that had a similar problem He was bending his right arm very early in the backswing, causing the club to go too far inside.

From there he was forced to get over active with the right wrist and flip through impact.

With just a few minutes training with the Rotary Connect his backswing position was much improved and the flip had all but disappeared.

So you can say goodbye to those thin and heavy shots, and look forward to winning a lot more money off your friends.

If you want to see the full video of how the Rotary Connect can make chipping simpler than you ever thought possible click here!

 

How To Properly Learn the Golf Swing

You’ve probably heard the old saying that if people tried to learn how to make love the same way they go about learning the golf swing that the human race become extinct. Sadly, golfers have millions of dollars in lessons and rarely ever improve. No matter how good the intentions of the instructor are, if they don’t understand how to teach their students new movement patterns based on how the brain actually learns, the student has little chance of ever improving.

Rotary Swing Tour is built entirely around this concept and has developed the only learning system in the world that is based entirely on the latest neural research in how the brain learns new motor movement patterns. That’s why ALL our students make dramatic, visible swing changes that are permanent like the one you see below:

In only one day, my student pictured above was able to completely transform his entire backswing working through the simple drills I have shared in the video “5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing“. If you’d like to learn more about how you can make these changes, visit “How to Build the Perfect Backswing“.

Ball Flight Teachers

In the world of golf instruction, there are basically two different types of teachers – ball flight teachers and method teachers. As someone who has spent years researching and developing the golf swing, it should come as no surprise that I fall in to the latter as a method teacher. RST is a method based on science, primarily the science of anatomy and human movement. It has parameters and “laws” if you will that are in place to guide you along the path and keep you from injuring yourself and developing bad habits.

A ball flight teacher only has the laws of ball flight to guide you along the way. For instance, if you slice, the ball flight teacher may have 5 or more different ways to fix your problem. All of these “fixes” can typically be called “band-aid” fixes because they only address symptoms of poor mechanics rather than the cause. As an example, imagine the golfer who doesn’t make a full shoulder turn and so he lifts his arms very steep to the top of the backswing and then hacks down from the top with only his arms; thus producing an over the top swing plane and out to in path. The ball flight teacher may fix this by having the golfer strengthen his grip to square the clubface to the path to create a pull. No doubt, this is better than a slice, but we haven’t addressed the root cause of the problem.

An RST golf instructor would look at this problem completely differently. The first thing we would do is teach the golfer what is causing his path and plane issues, which, in this case is the lack of body rotation which adds depth to the swing. Next, we would teach the golfer exactly HOW to turn, using the correct muscles. From there, the golfer would immediately see himself in positions he has never achieved and is now on the pathway to LASTING change and improvement.

We don’t do band-aids, we teach you how to move correctly. We fix the problem, not the symptom. Proper movements create a proper plane, path, impact position, etc. Chasing after ball flight problems without fixing faulty movement patterns is no different than a doctor that treats a compound fracture by putting a band-aid over it rather than resetting the bone. If you want lasting improvement and change in your game, stop putting band-aids on it and avoid ball flight instructors because you’ll end up having to go back again and again to apply new band-aids as the old ones “fall off”.

Of course, it should be made clear that I’m not saying ball flight is unimportant. It is very important. I’m simply saying the reason golfers haven’t improved over the past 50 years is because instruction hasn’t ever addressed the root cause of the problem. The truth of the matter is that ball flight is EASY to fix once the basic proper movement patterns have been established, which is exactly what RotarySwing.com is all about. We teach people via our online learning system HOW to create this basic, very simple movement patterns that you can see below in my swing:

Chuck Quinton Golf Swing

In the video of my swing above, you can see that my movements are very simple, very efficient, and if you compared my swing to that of Tiger Woods, you’d see striking similarity (for the comparison, click Build the Golf Swing of Your Dreams). The reason is that Tiger and I both move very efficiently and that movement is based on very basic anatomy and physics. When I hit a bad shot, say a cut shot, I don’t go and try and flip the face or strengthen my grip on the next swing, that would be manic constantly chasing after one fix or another! No, I simply look at the basic movement that created that shot. For me, if I hit a cut shot, I know I pulled too much with the left shoulder coming down and I have several drills, all of which are on the website, to correct the faulty movement. Therefore, I drill the correct movement for the next shot and correct the problem, thus fixing the symptom of the bad ball flight.

It’s the only way that makes ANY sense to learn the golf swing whatsoever. If you’re tired of bouncing from golf tip to golf tip that are all symptom based, get with the program – the Rotary Swing Tour Program and start progressing like all those in these testimonials.

Golfers Receive Unlimited Online Golf Lessons from RotarySwing.com’s Certified Instructors for Less than the Cost of One In-person Lesson

RotarySwing.com’s Latest Innovation, Online Learning Groups, Bridges the Gap Between Its Twenty-plus Hours of Online Golf Instruction Videos and In-person Lessons by Offering One Low Monthly Payment for Unlimited Online Golf Lessons with a Certified Instructor.

RotarySwing.com’s Latest Innovation, Online Learning Groups, Bridges the Gap Between Its Twenty-plus Hours of Online Golf Instruction Videos and In-person Lessons by Offering One Low Monthly Payment for Unlimited Online Golf Lessons with a Certified Instructor.

Windermere, FL | September 16, 2010 — Last week, RotarySwing.com launched a new feature called Online Learning Groups. At its core, this feature allows a golfer to easily submit videos, pictures, and questions to Rotary Swing Tour Certified Instructors and receive feedback about how to improve. While others in the industry offer similar online golf lessons, what sets the Groups concept apart are three additional benefits: unlimited instruction for less than the cost of one traditional lesson, a library of more than 20 hours of online golf instruction videos to support the process, and an ability to learn from peer group members.

The concept was originally proposed by one of the website’s members, Ray Wyvill, as a way to provide ongoing review of swing changes, monitoring that bad habits don’t creep back in and ensuring continual progression. Wyvill’s inspiration came from something his father told him about the one-room schools prevalent decades ago.

This is how Wyvill remembered his father’s words: “He said, ‘The best school I was ever in was the one-room school when I was a kid. More learning went on there than in any other school environment I ever saw. You’d be there working on something, the older kids would be working on what you’d get next, and the young kids were providing you with constant review.’”

RotarySwing.com’s Online Learning Groups are setup to foster this sort of 360-degree learning as students learn directly from instructors, by observing the instruction provided to other students, and by jumping in and helping their peers with an issue they’ve already tackled.

The economics of the group concept helps golfers get better at an affordable price. While in-person lessons typically range from $40 to $200 each and one standard online lesson can go for $30 or more, Online Learning Groups provide value by pairing unlimited online golf lessons with a price tag of $29.95 per month.

“In-person lessons offer some obvious advantages,” RotarySwing.com founder Chuck Quinton said. “But there are also some major drawbacks, including the price, which is on everyone’s mind these days because of the economy. With an Online Learning Group, for example, you’ll get expert help with a swing issue, and then you can have that re-checked a week later and even ask for some new advice a week after that…all for only $29.95. Compare that to in-person lessons, where you’ve just racked up three full lesson charges, probably totaling $200 or more.”

The feature’s success, though, will ultimately be determined by the experience of the group members. The results are extremely positive so far, based on feedback from those who took part in the pilot group the past three months.

“This is an experience like no other; you can post your swing and have members and an instructor critique it,” said pilot group member Steve Dodson. “This ensures your work on each move is done correctly, and if you’re applying this move correctly in your full swing. If you’re not a member, you’re missing out.”

More information about RotarySwing.com’s Online Learning Groups can be found here:http://www.rotaryswing.com/online-golf-lessons/learning-groups-home.php.

Free and Premium Membership details are available at http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/membership_info.php.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC, was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via RotarySwing.com, OnePlaneGolfSwing.com, and RotaryGolfSwing.com. These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling 20-plus hours of content, much of it available in high definition and on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, and club fittings. Quinton has authored two books: The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1. He has also produced the golf instruction DVDs Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple. More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and was the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado during 2009.

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This release went out via PRWeb.com on 8/6/2010.  You can find the PRWeb version here.

Learn How I’m Fixing My Top of Backswing Position with Proper Practice…

Proper practice with mirrors—but without a golf ball—helped RST Certified Instructor Sam Jarman improve his top of backswing position and can help you as well.

By Sam Jarman, RST Certified Instructor – Level 1

I’ve been working hard on my own game over the past few weeks, especially my posture and top of backswing position.  I played poorly in the National Assistants at East Sussex National a few weeks ago and that gave me a real kick up the backside as I felt I was playing well going into the tournament.  It proves that although on my good days I can play some really good stuff, my ball striking is still too inconsistent, especially in tough conditions as was the case at East Sussex in the first round.  Despite some decent driving, I just wasn’t controlling my golf ball well enough with my irons.

I put myself on video when I got back and there were some things I really didn’t like.  My posture was sloppy, I wasn’t loading into my right glute and right heel in the backswing, my right arm was loose and away from my body at the top of backswing position, my transition was weak and I was sliding rather than turning in the downswing.   All of which was leading to big pulls with my irons, and weak cuts with my driver.

There are two videos here which show the issues.

My first point of call was my posture.  I made sure I was sat back into my glutes and that my weight was going down through my ankles. I then set to work on my backswing movements and top of backswing position.  I have always had a problem sliding my hips to the right and getting onto the ball and the outside of my right foot.  It’s much better than it used to be before I started working on the Rotary swing stuff, but it still creeps back in.

The main point I want to stress in this piece is that I didn’t hit that many golf balls when I was working on this. One of the main conclusions I have come to is that a golf ball is a very poor feedback device when it comes to gaining information as to whether you have made a good movement or not.  You can hit a pretty decent golf shot with a not very good golf swing, and you can shank it with a move that is very close to perfect.

You can draw a couple of conclusions from this.  This first might be that if that is the case, why work on the swing at all?  Work on your short game and putting and accept the bad shots and learn to recover from them.  It seems to work pretty well for Phil Mickelson.  I actually think this is a great plan for most amateur golfers, except for the fact that very few people want to learn about and work hard on their short game.  Everyone I talk to wants to hit long, straight golf shots and to look good doing it.

This brings us to the second option; which is to work on the movement of the golf swing in a time and energy efficient way.  To cram as much learning into as short a time as possible, and to make that learning as durable as possible.  I promise you hitting golf balls is not the best way to learn the golf swing. Hitting balls is useful to see what the results of the change in movement pattern might be, but it is nigh on impossible to actually make the changes while worrying about where the ball has gone.

Most of my time was spent without a club and a ball, in front of two mirrors, one in front and one down the line, making small movements, chunking the movements down, chaining them back up until I could feel and, crucially, see in the mirrors exactly which parts of my body were doing what. Once I could feel it, I picked up a club and went over the process again, watching the effect that small changes in body position would have on the relative positions of the shaft and the clubface.

A real breakthrough was the understanding of the way the weight shift in the backswing affects the right arm.

As I wrote on the Forum; “I have always had trouble getting  the right arm under the club at the top of the backswing; I tend to get it loose and behind me.  I get over the top in the downswing and hit cuts with the driver and pulls with the irons.  Not pretty.

“Anyway, long story short, I had gotten a bit sloppy with my posture, and also was getting slightly onto the ball of my right foot, and not loaded into my right glute in the backswing.  Worked all day Friday on Move 1 weight shift and getting really planted onto the heel and into the glute.  Put myself on video on Sunday and the difference was very noticeable.  For the first time (ever?) I’m keeping the right arm in front of me and getting it under the club.

“Just thought I’d share this as I know a lot of people are struggling with the top of the backswing position, and maybe focusing on the right arm and shoulder elevation.  I thought it might be a lack of flexibility that was causing the problem.  As soon as I got the right heel in the ground and into the glute, the right arm just started behaving itself with no effort at all.  So if you are struggling with Move 2, go back and make sure you have Move 1 nailed down first.  For me, Move 2 is more of a result of a good Move 1 than a move on its own.”

The key point for me is that if I hadn’t been using the mirrors, I wouldn’t have spotted this. It was so obvious. At the top of the backswing it works this way:  Weight on the heel and in the glute, right arm in a good position.  Weight on the ball of the foot, right arm wings out and gets behind me.  Instant feedback.

For years I have been working on keeping the right arm tucked in.  I could have written a novel in the time I have spent hitting balls with a bloody glove in my right armpit.  What happens when the glove comes out?  The right arm flies away, because the problem isn’t the right arm, it’s the way the torso is moving over the hips.

Here is a video with my backswing starting to look somewhere near where I want it.  Next step is Move 3, the transition.

To learn more about Sam or contact him for lessons, check out his Certified Instructor bio and his golf instruction website.

Rotary Swing Golf Instructor Certification Program Makes Splash Globally, Welcomes New Certified Instructor from Croatia

The Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Certification process continues to improve the knowledge, skills, and visibility of golf instructors across the globe.

The Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Certification process continues to improve the knowledge, skills, and visibility of golf instructors across the globe.

Pirovac, Croatia — Last week, Neven Meic became the second to pass the Level 1 RST Certification exam.  Meic, based in Pirovac, Croatia, has the honor of being the first person outside the United States to complete the initial phase of RotarySwing.com’s golf instructor training program.

The speed at which RST Certification spread to other countries is not surprising to Rotary Swing Golf Founder Chuck Quinton.

“The bulk of our business originates from our strong web presence at RotarySwing.com, and our popularity internationally is on the rise,” said Quinton.  “Combine that with an online golf certification process for our level one training that meets instructors’ needs for affordability and convenience, and I expect to see RST Certified Instructors everywhere golf is played!”

Quinton indicated that the golf certification program has received significant interest since it launched in February 2010 and is excited about the opportunities ahead for his business as well as for the RST Certified Instructors.

“The RST golf instructor training promises to be a great vehicle for growth, not just for RotarySwing.com, but also for instructors teaching our methods,” said Quinton.  “The mutually beneficial nature of our certification program promises to drive its success.”

In addition to providing objective, scientific facts about golf instruction and the swing to improve golf coaching techniques, Rotary Swing Golf offers Certified Instructors promotional benefits to boost their revenues.  These golf instructors realize significant visibility through listings on the heavily trafficked RotarySwing.com, inclusion in weekly email newsletters to thousands of golfers, and postings on social media like Facebook and RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forums and Golf Instruction Blog.

“Not many golf instructors have websites that pull in thousands of visitors each day,” Quinton said.  “We can help them get their names out to potential students without spending a boatload on web design, search engine optimization, and online advertising.”

Ultimately, though, an instructor’s success comes down to the quality of golf instruction provided, and Quinton went to great lengths to ensure only the most knowledgeable golf instructors will earn certification.

According to the RST Golf Instructor Certification Overview page on RotarySwing.com, “The information that must be learned just to pass Level 1 requires on average 100 hours of study on swing mechanics, physics, anatomy, biomechanics, physiology and more.”  The website indicates that these fields represent “many disciplines typical golf instructor training neglects.”

For more information about RST Golf Instructor Certification, visit www.RotarySwing.com/rst-certification.

A link to the RST Certified Instructor listings, where Neven Meic’s bio can be found, is also available on that page.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling 19 hours of content, much of it available in high definition.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, club fittings and an online video community.  Quinton has authored two books:  The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide, and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1.  He has also produced the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida, and became the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado.

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This press release went out on 3/16/2010 via Free-Press-Release.com.  The FPR.com version can be found here:  http://www.free-press-release.com/news-rotary-swing-golf-instructor-certification-program-makes-splash-globally-welcomes-new-certified-instructor-from-croatia-1268753365.html.

Rotary Swing Golf Instructor Certification Pays for Itself Immediately for First Certified Instructor Sam Jarman

Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Certification is not only helping Sam Jarman teach more effectively but is also bringing in new clients after only one week of promotion on RotarySwing.com.

Rotary Swing Tour (RST) Certification is not only helping Sam Jarman teach more effectively but is also bringing in new clients after only one week of promotion on RotarySwing.com.

Northampton, England.  March 14, 2010 – Sam Jarman, a golf instructor based at Collingtree Park Golf Course in Northampton, England, continues to grow his business thanks to his association with Rotary Swing Golf.  On March 5, 2010, Jarman became the first golf instructor to pass the Level 1 RST Golf Instructor Certification course, and he has already enjoyed a 200% spike in traffic at SamJarmanGolf.com and an increase in lessons.

The quick results have not surprised Rotary Swing Golf Founder Chuck Quinton.

“RST golf instructor training promises to be a great vehicle for growth, not just for RotarySwing.com, but also for instructors teaching our methods,” said Quinton.  “The mutually beneficial nature of our certification program promises to drive its success.”

In addition to providing objective, scientific facts about the golf swing and golf instruction to improve golf coaching techniques, Rotary Swing Golf offers Certified Instructors promotional benefits to boost their revenues.  These golf instructors realize significant exposure through listings on the heavily trafficked RotarySwing.com, inclusion in weekly email newsletters to thousands of golfers, and postings on social media like Facebook and RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forums and Golf Instruction Blog.

“Not many golf instructors have websites that pull in thousands of visitors each day,” Quinton said.  “We can help them get their names out to potential students without spending a boatload on web design, search engine optimization, and online advertising.”

Ultimately, though, an instructor’s success comes down to the quality of golf instruction provided, and Quinton enthusiastically endorsed Jarman to RotarySwing.com’s Golf Forum members.

You guys will get a lot working with Sam,” wrote Quinton.  “He’s been teaching a long time and knows the RST well.  We’re very proud to have him as our first Certified RST Instructor!”

Jarman began his relationship with RotarySwing.com as a subscriber, trying to improve his own game.  He was immediately impressed with Quinton.

“There was a video of Chuck hitting a six iron, and his swing was awesome,” said Jarman.  “There are very few good golf coaches who can actually walk the walk, as well as talk the talk.”

After working through the golf instruction videos on RotarySwing.com and taking online lessons with Quinton, Jarman reached new levels of success, both personally and professionally.

The website is without a doubt the best golf instruction resource anywhere on the internet,” Jarman said.  “I am hitting the best golf shots of my life now, and I am having great success teaching Chuck’s ideas to my students, of all ages and abilities, from beginners to scratch golfers.”

And all of that was before becoming a RST Certified Instructor.  Jarman learned so much from the required Instructor Certification Manual that he called it a “massively good value” when compared with competing materials.

For more information about RST Golf Instructor Certification, visit www.RotarySwing.com/rst-certification.  A link to the RST Certified Instructor listings, where Sam Jarman’s bio can be found, is also available on that page.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling 19 hours of content, much of it available in high definition.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer a podcast, golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, club fittings and an online video community.  Quinton has authored two books:  The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide, and the Rotary Swing Tour Instructor Certification Manual – Level 1.  He has also produced the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida and became the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado.

For more information, contact Rotary Swing Golf Business Manager Josh Eaton at (734) 306-1607.

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This press release went out via Free-Press-Release.com on March 15, 2010.  View the FPR version here:  http://www.free-press-release.com/news-rotary-swing-golf-instructor-certification-pays-for-itself-immediately-for-first-certified-instructor-sam-jarman-1268674942.html.

Olympics Serve as Reminder Why New RotarySwing.com Golf Instruction Book Long Overdue for Instructors, Golfers

Endeavoring to shift golf instruction away from contradictions plaguing the industry and toward the Olympic model of technique convergence, RotarySwing.com’s new book unveils the most efficient swing humanly possible.

Endeavoring to shift golf instruction away from contradictions plaguing the industry and toward the Olympic model of technique convergence, RotarySwing.com’s new book unveils the most efficient swing humanly possible.

Windermere, FL (PRWEB) February 26, 2010 – Last week, Chuck Quinton, founder of Rotary Swing Golf and RotarySwing.com, unveiled the much anticipated Rotary Swing Tour (RST)  Level 1 Certification Manual for purchase by golf instructors and students alike.  RST Certification aims to move golf instruction away from opinions, personal preference and interpretation of Tour pro swings and toward the Olympic training model, the basis of which is scientific research and facts about how the human body moves safely and most efficiently.

Click image to read excerpts from the RST Instructor Certification Manual - Level 1
Click image to read excerpts from the RST Instructor Certification Manual - Level 1

Quinton is surprised the golf instruction industry continues chasing the latest fad or favorite swings of each era, somehow avoiding the evolution experienced in most Olympic sports.  In speed skating, ski jumping and high jump (to name but three), all competitors’ techniques are essentially the same thanks to research uncovering the most efficient body movements necessary for success.

Perhaps this absence of evolution in golf instruction explains why handicaps have hardly changed the past few decades, despite unprecedented advancements in technology.

“The lack of handicap improvement is an indictment of our industry,” said Quinton.  “A paradigm shift was needed in golf instruction.  We didn’t care what Tour pros did.  Ideal models aren’t based on popularity; they are objective and based on facts about science, the body and the brain.”

This 140-plus page golf instructor certification manual is the culmination of his research.  It offers a foundation in disciplines such as physics, anatomy, biomechanics and physiology to help ensure golf instructors no longer struggle to answer students’ tough questions like “Why am I doing this?” and “How exactly do I get into that position?”

“Many golfers are told they can’t make a full shoulder turn due to a lack of flexibility,” said Quinton.  “They’re victims of bad information.  I’ve never had a student who couldn’t make a full 90 degree turn after I teach them how to use the muscles truly responsible for rotating the body.  Understanding some basic anatomy and biomechanics is the key to helping golfers improve and avoid injury.”

And although the term “golf biomechanics” has been bandied about for several years now, RST redefines the category.

“Most golf biomechanics data comes from top players’ swings,” said Quinton.  “Unfortunately, all of these players are flawed, some significantly so. Statistics show that over 80% of professional golfers will miss 8 weeks of competitive play due to injury during their careers. The vast majority of these injuries could easily be avoided.”

Quinton pointed out that a number of pros in the 1970s had huge hip slides in their swings and played great golf.  Now, they are lining up for hip replacements.

“Basing your swing on Tour pros can be hazardous to your health!” said Quinton.  “Science, not your favorite Tour player, should dictate your swing model.”

The RST model meets this tough standard and receives support from Dr. Jeff Broker, former Senior Biomechanist for the U.S. Olympic Committee and current member of the Rotary Swing Golf Medical Panel.

“It’s based on sound biomechanics….It’s a very simple model, yet it’s powerful,” said Dr. Broker.

Importantly, the RST Instructor Certification Manual doesn’t just stop with the swing model.  It supplies an introduction to research about how the brain learns complex movement patterns–like the golf swing–and how instructors must use this information to maximize students’ practice time and effect real change.

For more information about RST Certification, visit http://www.rotaryswing.com/rst-certification/.

The RST Certification Manual can be purchased as an eBook ($29.95) or a paperback ($49.95).  Click here for details:  http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-training-aids/rotary_swing_tour_certification_manual-level_1.

About Rotary Swing Golf

Rotary Swing Golf, LLC was founded in 2006 by golf professional Chuck Quinton and is one of the world’s leading providers of subscription-based online golf instruction via www.RotarySwing.com, www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com and www.RotaryGolfSwing.com.  These websites offer more than 180 instructional videos, totaling 19 hours of content, much of it available in high definition.  In addition, Rotary Swing Golf’s websites offer golf training aids, online golf lessons, an active forum with nearly 5000 members, club fittings and an online video community.  Quinton has authored The Rotary Swing golf instruction book that has sold thousands of copies worldwide as well as the instructional DVD series Swing Plane Made Simple and Short Game Made Simple.  More recently, Quinton founded the Rotary Swing Golf Academy at Sugarloaf Mountain near Orlando, Florida and became the Teaching Professional at Castle Pines Golf Club in Colorado.

For more information, contact Rotary Swing Golf Business Manager Josh Eaton at 734-306-1607.

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This went out via PRWeb on February 26, 2010, at noon Eastern.  You may view the full release here.

Anthony Kim: A Complete Swing Analysis

A two time winner on the PGA Tour, Anthony Kim represents one of the many young, rising talents who has made people sit up and take notice every time he tees it up at an event.  He earned his card through qualifying school in 2007, and made quite the splash during his rookie season notching four top ten finishes.  When examining AK’s statistics from his injury riddled 2009 season, his ball striking numbers were quite fascinating given the much discussed “simplistic” nature of his swing.
Driving Distance:  16th
Driving Accuracy: 175th
Total Driving: 103rd
Greens in Regulation: 164th
Let’s take a look from an RST perspective of both the positives and negatives of Kim’s golf swing.

SETUP
Looking from the face on view, we can immediately notice that Kim’s stance is much wider than 2 inches outside of neutral joint alignment.  This places him in an anatomically inefficient position, which is going to force him to move laterally during the backswing.

AKSetup

From the down the line view, we can see Kim could use more hinge from the hip.  Take notice of the line drawn from his posterior to the ground.  The lack of space from this line to the back of his heels is a clear tell he needs more hinge from the hips.  When examining his weight distribution, the back of Kim’s knees are not directly over the center of his ankle joints, which informs us that his weight is on the balls of his feet at address which will place unwanted rotational stress on the left knee during the downswing.  Finally, the elbows are extended outside of the shoulders, which indicates a slight reaching for the ball.  The farther we extend our arms, the more the weight is shifted to the balls of our feet.  To briefly summarize, Kim is not grounded and anchored correctly at address which places the body in an anatomically incorrect position.

MOVE 1
As Kim starts his takeaway, he makes an excellent shoulder turn away from the ball.  There is no evidence of arm swing, and as he finishes Move 1, his arms are straight and remain directly in front of his sternum.  In addition to a wonderful shoulder turn, I want to highlight the lack of hip rotation.  Kim executes Move 1 by turning his shoulders 45 degrees and the hip turn is almost 0 degrees, exactly the way RST defines Move 1.

AKMove1

AKChuckMove1

Although Kim executes Move 1 very well, his excessively wide stance forces him to have an exaggerated lateral shift to the right.  We have talked at great length in the past of why lateral movement is undesirable in the golf swing, and if you would like to read more please refer to “Why Can’t I Stay Centered” blog.

MOVE 2
As with many players that I encounter on a daily basis, AK starts to get in some trouble during Move 2.  Once the shoulders turn 45 degrees, we need to employ some shoulder elevation to keep the club in front of our chest, keep the club on plane, and prevent the arms from working too far around the body.  AK fails in this critical area.  Take note of his hand position in the following picture.  The arms have nowhere to go when they remain pinned to the body in such a manner.  The club subsequently now works too far around and behind the chest as he arrives at the top of his swing.  In addition, take note of how Kim’s back foot has rolled to the outside.  He has failed to roll the ankles in slightly at address, and once the weight moves to the outside portion of the right foot during the backswing, this makes it much more difficult to transfer the weight efficiently back to the left in the downswing.

AKMove2SE

AKMove2Foot

MOVE 3
From my multiple film study of Kim’s swing, I found a very interesting trend.  There were some balance inconsistencies in a number of swings I examined.  For example, on certain swings I noticed the left heel spinning out indicating the weight had been transferred onto the ball of the left foot in the downswing.

AnthonyKimLegs

In another example, Kim fell backwards slightly indicating his weight was still trapped on his right side.

AKOffBalance

The penultimate issue that I see causing the downswing problems reverts back to the arms being trapped behind the body due to the lack of shoulder elevation.  This paired with the wide stance and the weight shifting to the outside portion of his right foot certainly will cause weight transfer issues even for a golfer with tremendous talent.  Kim displays tendencies to push from his right side in the downswing to compensate for the lateral shift exhibited in the backswing, note the right foot is quite active.  This pushing move, in addition to Kim’s aggressive hip rotation will accentuate the arms getting stuck behind him on the way into impact and may help explain his 2009 ball striking statistics.

AKMove3

Steve Stricker: A Complete Swing Analysis Part 2 (The Takeaway)

Before I begin to discuss Stricker’s Move 1, it is necessary to briefly summarize how Rotary swing classifies the correct sequence for the Takeaway.
1.    Golfer in proper posture, in the box with the lat muscles engaged.
2.    Hips shift 1 inch right transferring approximately 80% of the weight into the right heel (right hip almost to the point of being directly over the right ankle.)
3.    Right shoulder blade glide (pulling the right shoulder) focusing on moving the scapula two inches in and slightly down toward the spine.
4.    Torso turns 45 degrees.
5.    Hips turn 0 degrees.
6.    Arms remain passive, straight, and directly in line with the sternum.

Given our understanding of the forces of rotary motion (please see the blog “Why Can’t I Stay Centered?”), we know a pulling motion is an action that moves an object toward center, while a push is a force moving an object away from center.  It becomes quite clear that we must invoke a pulling motion in order to efficiently turn the torso in a fashion that keeps us centered during the backswing.  This move also serves as a spine stabilizer during the backswing, in turn, protecting the spine during this phase of the swing.  Any origin of movement that comes from the left side of the body is a push, and Stricker’s Move 1 is a prime example of its effects.


Stricker initiates his swing with a forward press of the hands.  The club is subsequently started back by a pushing motion from his left side.  His left arm pushes across his chest which immediately causes a disconnection from his core rotation.


He is now at the mercy of his arms to turn his shoulders, which can be observed by looking at the figure above.  Notice the difference in shoulder turn between Chuck and Stricker as the club is parallel to the ground.  It is quite clear that the arms have been forced significantly behind Stricker’s sternum by this point.  As a result, the right arm is no longer straight, but instead has been forced to bend.  In addition, the left wrist has begun to pronate, as can be observed by the circles.


Pay particular attention to the logo on Chuck’s glove as compared to Stricker’s glove.  The culmination of these movements results in the club getting inside, the hands and arms working too deep, and the club being moved on a flat plane.

A Shift in the Right Direction

I am extremely proud to be working with Hooters Tour Professional Kris Lim.  Kris is an extraordinary young man, whose desire to excel is only exceeded by his desire to understand the fundamentals of the golf swing.  Kris did not come to the Rotary Swing Golf Academy looking for quick fixes to improve his game immediately; he came to us seeking answers to questions that were not able to be provided to him through “traditional” instruction.  He was tired of hearing that his swing looked great; he wanted results.  Kris is a prime example of the type of change that is possible through intellectual understanding and kinesthetic awareness that comes as a product of structured practice that focuses on the anatomical absolutes.

In previous forum posts, I provided some examples of how we first began a little over a month ago.  We started by addressing Kris’s Setup and perfecting Move 1 (The Takeaway).  As these elements improved, we introduced proper shoulder elevation to keep the club working on a proper plane throughout the backswing.  Today is November 23, and it was time for some serious business…Move 3 (The Downswing).  Kris is a prime example of a golfer who would rotate his hips without ever making a proper weight shift into the left heel.  The results of this dastardly movement can be illustrated from the picture below.

On the left side is a trace of Kris’s swing path.  The red line represents his backswing, and the yellow line represents his downswing.  It becomes quite clear Kris was over the top which resulted in many “wiped” shots that would weakly balloon and fade.  On the right side, you can plainly see Kris’s failure to shift that left hip which left him well short of Neutral Joint Alignment.  Kris’s weight is now trapped on his right side which results in the excessive axis tilt and his head backing way up as he comes into impact.  He never covers the golf ball effectively, and fails to compress or flight the shot the way he desires.  Due to his improper origin of movement, the more he would try to cover the ball, the more fat shots he would hit.

Now let’s examine footage from the lesson on November 23.  On the left, you can see a significant improvement in Kris’s swing path.  The red line represents his backswing, and the yellow line represents his downswing once again, but take note the orientation of the lines are dramatically different.  Due to the backswing improvements, Kris takes the club on a much better plane, and is capable of keeping the club in front of his body.  A proper weight shift, planting the left heel and pulling from the left oblique allows the club to shallow slightly and attack the ball from the inside (note the yellow downswing line is underneath the red backswing line).  On the right half of the picture, you can see Kris’s head has not backed up nearly as much, and the axis tilt is improved.  Kris’s left hip has shifted toward the target before he unwinds the hips which allows him to get into NJA at impact.

I want to mention at no time during this lesson did we talk about swing plane or what the club was doing; we focused solely on proper origin of movement in the downswing.  The golf swing needs to be based on a pull-pull relationship in order to abide by the laws of physics of rotary motion.  Kris serves as an excellent model of what can be achieved by focusing on how the human body is designed to work.  While we have lots of work left to do, Kris is finally traveling on the road to success.  RST provides the road map for this journey…want to follow along?

Why Can’t I Stay Centered?

I am entering my seventh month as a certified RST instructor, and the number one issue that I see plaguing my students is the ability to minimize head movement and stay centered during the swing.  While it may seem benign enough, I can tell you this problem destroys speed, power, and efficiency of the golf swing.

Examining the golf swing from a purely scientific perspective, we can all agree that the swing is circular.  It stands to reason that we can summon upon our tedious days in physics class to further understand the laws of motion that govern our golf swing.  Who knew our college general education requirement could help us hit more greens in regulation?  The diagram below illustrates the forces at work during circular motion.

The Rotary Swing is based upon creating centripetal force.  Centripetal force can be defined as the component of force acting on a body in curvilinear motion that is directed toward the center of curvature or axis of rotation.  Using the diagram above, we can plainly see that the origin of movement is the figure rotating in the center of the circle.  The figure rotates in order to swing the ball on the end of the string in a circular fashion.  The faster the central figure rotates, the faster the ball will travel at the end of the string.

What would happen to the speed and path of the ball if the central figure moved several inches to the left or right during this rotation?  Would the ball on the end of the string accelerate at a greater rate?  You don’t need a Ph.D. to recognize that once the fixed origin of movement is moved, the resulting path of the ball is disturbed by the added lateral movement.  This is exactly what happens to a golfer that exhibits excessive lateral head movement as the swing begins.  The origin of movement has been disturbed, negatively affecting the speed, power, and efficiency of the resulting swing.

Hope I did my college professor from American University proud with my contrite explanation of circular motion, but now the question becomes, how do I stop this from happening in my swing?  This is what we golfers really care about; no offense Mr. Newton.

First, check your stance width.  Remember that advice you received about your stance being shoulder width apart?  Let’s think about that for one moment.  As Chuck Quinton so eloquently stated to me, “The last time I checked, my legs and feet were attached to my hips, not my shoulders.  Why would the width of my shoulders have anything to do with how wide I want to stand?”  Rather than using the shoulders, the Rotary Swing provides an exact measurement for each golfer to find the appropriate stance width to maximize the swing base and prevent excessive lateral head movement: you must have the center of each ankle joint two inches outside of neutral joint alignment.  In other words, the center of your ankle joint at Setup will be positioned two inches outside the center of your hip joint on each side.  Any wider than this, it becomes very difficult to prevent lateral head movement during your backswing and will interrupt the creation of rotary motion.

Second, in order to create a truly rotary motion, make a full shoulder turn, and minimize lateral head movement, the golfer MUST pull the right shoulder (for right-handed golfers) behind his head to create the desired backswing.  To most golfers, this will feel quite alien in nature, as almost all golfers start the swing either with the hands, arms, or left side.  Any such movement to start the backswing forces the golfer away from center and now has the golfer moving in a linear fashion.  The head and upper body are forced to follow the motion, and the result is a swing sapped of power.

RST’s goal is to create movement that rotates around the spine while staying centered.  If you have been scratching your head asking that perplexing question, “Why can’t I stay centered?” I just provided you with two possible answers.  Check that stance; work on pulling that right shoulder behind you to start your swing, and pay attention in physics class!

Learning Proper Weight Shift…from a Frisbee?

Rotary Swing students must have a firm understanding of one of the key goals of the swing model, to utilize a proper right to left weight shift (for righties) just as we would in any other throwing or hitting sport.  Most amateur golfers underestimate the importance of this simple yet critical step in the golf swing.  You could have the best takeaway in the world, but if you are hitting the ball off your back foot, you are doomed to struggle.

A great way to gain a deeper understanding of proper weight shift would to be to grab a Frisbee and head into your backyard.

When we examine my fine Frisbee form, you can see the kinetic sequence as it evolves.  I begin by twisting my torso opposite the direction of the throw.  The rotation of my torso turning pulls my hips around as my weight transfers into my rear ankle joint.  My weight now shifts into my front heel as the front foot plants.  Once planted, my hips begin to rotate causing my upper body to lag behind.  I continue my pivot, and my right arm begins to extend and the disk is propelled out of my hand as the shoulders and arm are pulled through with maximum power, speed, and extension.  Does this chain of events look familiar to anyone?  We can learn many lessons from a simple Frisbee toss, but the take home message that you can apply to your golf swing is simply this, in order to maximize your efficiency, you need to learn to utilize a proper weight shift.  My power was produced by loading into my trailing side, and transferring my weight back to the leading side.  My first move down was to transfer my weight into my front heel and unwind my hips.  At no time did I attempt to use my small muscles in my arms and shoulders to propel the disk forward.  It would not work well with a Frisbee, and its works even less efficiently with a golf club in your hands.

Missing “The How”

“If I stop learning today, I will be teaching badly tomorrow.” (Unknown) Good advice from a relative unknown wouldn’t you say?  OK.  Vegas is not in my future, maybe I better leave the humor to the professionals.  

When I began to pursue my dream of teaching the game that my grandfather forced me to love so much as a youngster, I wanted to understand everything I could about the swing.  I realized that my self- taught point and shoot method probably would not be all that successful for any perspective students.  I began my research.  I watched video tapes, read books, observed lessons, and tried a multitude of swing theories for myself.  I took copious notes on what I liked, and jotted down even more quips about the things that didn’t work at all.  Volumes later, I felt I had a pretty successful manual in place for teaching the game…or did I?

One thing I will state as clearly as possible, to my own credit, I have no ego.  I have never been one to trumpet my way as the only way, or even the correct way for that matter.  I had a very good success rate with students, and there were very few occasions that I felt they walked away from their time spent with me, and were not improved in some fashion.  I did, however, feel that my skills were lacking, not from an analytical or intellectual standpoint, but something was just missing.  I could not place my finger on the pulse of the problem, but I would think about it constantly.  This fact may speak volumes about my ongoing insomnia, but that is a discussion for another blog someday soon.

I attempted to broaden my horizons by reading books about how people learn, and let me tell you, for a guy who went through college, graduate school, and a stint in medical school with an undiagnosed reading disability, this was no small task!  At the end of the day, I was still searching for the missing pieces…until Rotary Swing.

Most teachers are knowledgeable. Good teachers are intelligent. Great teachers are patient. Exceptional teachers are students themselves.” (Dale Dubin. M.D.)

I was knowledgeable, I was intelligent, and I was patient; so what was still missing?  Meeting Chuck Quinton and Alison Thietje gave my elusive question a definitive answer; I was missing “The How.”  I lacked the key kinesthetic knowledge to explain to my students how to swing the club.  There are a number of ways to turn your shoulders, but only one correct way to initiate the movement, remain centered, and create centripetal force.  Rotary Swing, unlike my swing model, was not based on opinions and preferences, but it was based on medical and scientific facts about how the body is designed to move.  This made everything crystal clear in my eyes; it does not matter if you can manipulate the club haphazardly into a series of “correct” positions if the origin of movement is wrong.  You are destined to fail more often than you are destined to succeed.

The process of discovery for me has been a six month journey that I have enjoyed every step of the way.  I continue to learn something new every single day I encounter a student, whether it be online or in person.  I will make certain that never changes because being a Rotary Swing Instructor is not just about being a knowledgeable, a good, or a great teacher; it is about being a student myself, and striving to be an exceptional teacher.